green initiatives

Conserving our natural resources

Living Green

As one of the leading document solution providers in the Southeast, DocuSystems understands how important it is to take care of our natural resources.

Conservation and living green are an integral part of the social consciousness in the world, including right here in South Carolina. One way to start saving on costs and becoming more environmentally friendly is by saving on paper usage. Using paper is something that is unavoidable in an office setting. Simply by emphasizing the importance of saving paper, you can help the environment by preventing inefficient waste.

 

Some ways to help you save on office paper usage:

  • Moving to a more digital way of doing things can save a lot of paper thereby reducing the need to print off digital documents
  • Printing on both sides of the paper. This is a common feature on almost all printers and copiers today and will reduce the use of paper by half in many cases
  • Ensuring that documents are edited before printing can save on paper, as you will avoid unnecessary printing altogether

Using Less Energy = Saving More Money.

At DocuSystems all of our machines are Energy Star compliant! Our office equipment has earned Energy Star approval certifying that each product has passed energy conserving tests and inspections. DocuSystems products are built using efficient designs that allow the machines to use less energy to perform tasks. The machines automatically enter a low-power mode when not in use which can help our customers save on their energy bills. When you use Energy STAR machines you help reduce waste, save money, and do your part in Living Green! 

Our Partners Living Green

Konica Minolta

Konica Minolta has developed a technology that blends PET plastic with PC from water bottles to create a recycled material that can be used in the outer casing of MFPs. This is the first use of recycled materials for the outer casing of MFPs in the industry. They have also started producing toner bottles made from recycled HDPE plastics from recycled milk bottles.

 

Konica Minolta’s own Simitri toner is made with plant-based “biomass” materials. It contains smaller particles than ordinary toner which cuts toner consumption by 30+%.

Induction Heating (IH) Fixing technology only heats the roller’s surface rather than the entire roller. This reduces power consumption during the fixing process and results in shorter warm-up times. In addition, this feature automatically cuts off residual fixing heat when no print jobs are taking place, further contributing to energy savings. 

Canon

Canon’s Advanced Color RAPID Fusing uses a ceramic heater to apply heat onto a thin fixing sleeve, allowing for instantaneous heat transfer to the fixing point. This reduces the amount of heat and energy needed to print documents.

 

Thanks to LED arrays, Canon imageRUNNER ADVANCE devices can reduce scanning energy consumption by up to 75%. These arrays also last longer and operate with less heat. Color image readers use a proprietary image sensor reducing energy consumption by up to 50% compared to previous systems.

Ricoh

HP is finding ways to increase the amount and type of recycled materials in their products, and have set an industry-leading goal to use 30 percent recycled plastic across their Print portfolio by 2025.

HP has sourced more than 450 tonnes from ocean-bound plastic bottles for recycling and reuse that might have otherwise washed into the ocean. That is equal to roughly 35 million bottles that have been processed and used in the manufacturing of new HP products and supplies.

 

Products like the HP Elite c1030 Chromebook, which is the world’s first Chromebook with ocean-bound plastic also contains 75% recycled aluminum in its top lid, and has a keyboard made from 50% recycled plastics. This Chromebook joins a series of HP personal systems products made with ocean-bound plastic.

Hewlett-Packard

HP is finding ways to increase the amount and type of recycled materials in their products and have set an industry-leading goal to use 30 percent recycled plastic across their personal systems, print hardware, and supplies by 2025.

HP has sourced more than 450 metric tonnes of ocean-bound plastic bottles for recycling and reuse that might have otherwise washed into the ocean. That is equal to roughly 35 million bottles that have been process and used in the manufacturer of new HP products and supplies.

Products like the HP Elite c1030 Chromebook, which is one of the world’s first Chromebooks with ocean-bound plastic and also contains 75% recycled aluminum in its top lid, a keyboard made from 50% recycled plastics, and speakers with ocean-bound plastics. This Chromebook joins a series of HP personal systems products made with ocean-bound plastic.